International Gloster Breeders Association

Affiliated to

International-Ornithological-Association
National-Council-for-Aviculture-NCA

International Gloster Breeders Association

Affiliated to

International-Ornithological-Association
National-Council-for-Aviculture-NCA

International Gloster
Breeders Association

Gloster Colour Debate – Colours and ‘Pure Breeding’

Gloster Colour Debate – Colours and ‘Pure Breeding’

I cannot allow the letter about Gloster Canaries in the January 31 issue of Cage and Aviary Birds to go unanswered.

The colours that now seem to be causing a problem have been around for a long time. For instance agate was first reported in the late 17th century but was not established due to lack of understanding of genetics it appeared in the very early 1900s and this time it became established this applies to all the other colours as there are mutations in Canaries.

Thus by interbreeding of different varieties of Canary these mutations can be passed to any variety, and if you crossed a roller Canary to pass the mutation to say a Norwich it would be a while before the Norwich could be brought back up to a reasonable standard

I assume the “finch” mentioned refers to the red hooded siskin which was used to produce the fantastic red canaries of today. The only thing that the siskin brings is the red colour which has been brought out by skilful breeding.

If any red canaries were crossed into the Gloster it could be easily seen, and indeed has been done to produce what I believe was called the Stafford. It was done to produce a red Gloster but due to feather type it has proved impossible to produce a red Gloster of the desired type therefore no serious Gloster breeder would do such a thing.

In Glosters the desire for the cobby shape resulted in double buffing with hardly a yellow used, the result was very few yellows and those shown were a poor quality and very poor colour. When it was realised that yellows were needed to cure the problems of persistent double buffing further lumps very poor colour in the buffs and greens that were more brown than green, a solution was looked for.

I have it on very good authority that yellow borders of outstanding colour were crossed in and then back crossed to Glosters this is interesting as Glosters were produced initially by crossing together small borders, crested rollers and the crested canary, also called the crested Norwich.

There’s no harm can come to the “purebred” Gloster by using the different colours although the term “purebred” can only be used loosely given that the result of crossing different breeds is generally known as a mongrel.

Clive Simpson  S282 – Roweltown, Carlisle

Article printed with permission of Cage & Aviary Birds. Publication Issue 6305 February 28th 2024 

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Formed in 1966 the world’s largest All-Gloster Society devoted to keeping, breeding and the welfare of Gloster Canaries.

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Join the International Gloster Breeders Association

Formed in 1966 the world’s largest All-Gloster Society devoted to keeping, breeding and the welfare of Gloster Canaries.

Join the International Glosters Breeders Association and become an activate member of our community

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