International Gloster Breeders Association

Affiliated to

International-Ornithological-Association
National-Council-for-Aviculture-NCA

International Gloster Breeders Association

Affiliated to

International-Ornithological-Association
National-Council-for-Aviculture-NCA

International Gloster
Breeders Association

Gloster Colour Debate – C & A Letters Response

Gloster Colour Debate – C & A Letters Response

As a starting point in this debate maybe we need to recognise how the Gloster Canary was created. Around a hundred years ago the Gloster canary did not exist. Though, thankfully, the vision to create it did.

1920 Gloster

The start in its evolution towards the wonderful breed we see today, only happened because different breeds of canary where crossed together to provide the starting platform for today’s bird.

2020 example of breed type change to Standard Pictorial
2024 Gloster

With the long term aim of producing what we now see. 

If breeders back then had dismissed these starting blocks as the “mongrels” that they were out of hand, then we would not have today’s modern Gloster.     

Thankfully dedicated breeders worked diligently with these cross breeds, focussed on a vision of what the Gloster might become in the future. If you carried out DNA tests on today’s “pure” Gloster, it would surely show evidence of other breeds. All be it only a tiny, tiny percentage.

While it is admirable in wanting to protect any breed of bird from regressing, opinions will always carry more weight if supported by evidence backed up with a full understanding of mathematics, basic genetics and history rather than assumption. 

If a “finch” was used in producing “new colour” Glosters, what finch and when? 

My understanding, and correct me if I am wrong, is that it was mutation canaries that were used in the initial crosses that led to “new colours”. If it was indeed canaries that were used, then it isn’t too different to the process that started today’s “pure” Glosters a hundred years ago.

The current “new colour” Glosters we are seeing represent decades of work. Initially by continental breeders and continued by fanciers in this country. 

Some of the breeders , both here but particularly on the continent, number some of the leading fanciers around. Fanciers with a long history of winning top awards at top shows over many years with “traditional” Glosters. 

To call the fruits of their labour “illicit “ is grossly demeaning and undersells their talents as top Gloster breeders.

The “new colours” seen over the past few years, have on occasions won best in show at some of the most prestigious shows in Europe. While in this country they are already making the top table at some of the UKs top events. 

Doing so on merit when assessed as “Glosters”. How would this be possible if they weren’t good examples of what a Gloster should be?

So to the question “am I fulfilling this constitution “?

As someone involved in running an All Gloster Show. What are my responsibilities and to whom am I responsible?

The prime objective is to hold a show that promotes the breeding and showing of Gloster Canaries. While at the same time giving the most important people in the equation (the members/exhibitors) what they want. In this respect we are more than fulfilling our role.

It is all well and good an individual or a clique demanding that “new colours” not be recognised. 

However, whether it is liked or not, nobody has the right to tell individual fanciers what they should or should not keep. 

Nor does anyone have a Devine right to dictate what a fancier can show and where. 

The reason that we at the South Coast All Gloster annual show have put classes on for “new colours” is simple. That being because we had members ask us to provide classes for them. We were more than happy to do so as a part of our unwritten “constitution “ is “give the members what the members want”.

Whatever your view on the validity of “new colours” they are here and here to stay. 

Leave any choice on whether to keep them or not to all individual fanciers and where possible give them a platform at shows to promote whatever they breed. 

Who knows, it may well add to the attraction of keeping Glosters. Stimulating interest among established breeders and ,hopefully, attracting newcomers to what is a shrinking hobby.

Paul Burnett  B139 Portsmouth, Champion Breeder/Exhibitor, International Judge 

Article published in Cage & Aviary Birds. Letters. Issue 6304 February 21 2024

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Formed in 1966 the world’s largest All-Gloster Society devoted to keeping, breeding and the welfare of Gloster Canaries.

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Join the International Gloster Breeders Association

Formed in 1966 the world’s largest All-Gloster Society devoted to keeping, breeding and the welfare of Gloster Canaries.

Join the International Glosters Breeders Association and become an activate member of our community

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